Archives for posts with tag: Architectural Photography

Oxford University Biochemistry Building at dusk, Oxford, UK. Architects: Hawkins Brown, Built 2008

Coloured glass fins of Oxford University Biochemistry Building in evening light

Abstract detail of the Coloured glass fins of Oxford University Biochemistry Building

Coloured glass fins set against the sky

Fire in the Evening, Paul Klee, Oil on board, 1929

Coloured glass fins of the New Oxford University Biochemistry Building, by Hawkins Brown frame views in and out of the building, creating complex and subtle patterns of colour as the light changes. According to the architects the fins reflect the rich red, terracotta, orange, brown and purple of the nearby buildings though to me they have a refreshingly assertive identity of their own.

The final combination and rhythm of colours was influenced by the Bauhaus artist Paul Klee’s theories as can be seen by looking at his works such as “Fire in the Evening” (above). This sophisticated use of colour in architecture won the building the WAN Colour in Architecture award in 2011. For another stunning use of coloured glass in architecture see my photographs of “My Rainbow Horizon” in Denmark

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Mural text reads “Martyrdom is the art of the men of God”. Imam Khomeini” and “Generals Shiroodi and Keshvari”

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran (notice two windows in the wall)

Mural text reads “The Martyr Pilots of IRI Army Aviation: Major-General Mansour VatanPour, Major-General Seyed Shahrokh Azin”,

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran

Obscured English text reads “Down with USA & Israel. His excellency the leader: Imam Khomeini’s followers are always supporting Palestinians and fight their enemies”

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran

Murals commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) Tehran, Iran, 2008. Please let me know if you can help translating the Farsi in the images above where no translation is shown.

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Exterior of Ice house or Yakhchal, Abarqu, Iran

Brick interior of Yakhchal

An ice house or Yakhchal is an ancient refrigerator allowing the storage of ice in the desert in summer. It was collected in winter and kept cool by its shape and walls made from special mortar called srooj, composed of sand, clay, egg whites, lime, goat hair, and ash, which was resistant to heat transfer. Abarqu, Iran, 2008

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Gravesend Library new entrance at dusk. Architect: Clay Architecture

The project which opened in 2011 by Clay Architecture involved the conservation, refurbishment and fit-out of a 106 year-old Grade II listed Carnegie Library building in Gravesend, Kent

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Broadgate Exchange House, London. Detail of facade showing parabolic segmented tied arches spanning the full 78m across the railway tracks entering Liverpool Street Station. Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Built 1990

Exchange House, Broadgate is special category of building as it is effectively an inhabited bridge. The building is a 10-storey office building spanning 78m over Liverpool Street Station. The building frame of Exchange House is supported on a primary structure of four parabolic segmented tied arches spanning the full 78m across the railway tracks entering Liverpool Street Station. Two external arches are visible and set 2m from the building façades and two internal arches pass through the offices and are exposed in the atria. Transverse, open-webbed beams span between the arches and vertical “columns” transfer the floor loads to the arches by either compression or tension, depending on their position.

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Detail of Centre Point Tower, London. Architect: Richard Seifert. Built: 1966

Centre Point Tower, London is a controversial Grade II-listed concrete Brutalist 117m Skyscraper designed by Richard Seifert in 1966. Nikolaus Pevsner described Centre Point as “coarse in the extreme”.  The building remained without tenants until 1975 due to the management style of property tycoon Harry Hyams who would only lease the building to a single company to reduce his management cost. Needless to say this was met with criticisms of greed at the time.

After winning the Concrete Society’s Mature Structures Award in 2009 the building is receiving more love and a £350 million overhaul of the skyscraper has been revealed in 2012 by Rick Mather Architects and Conran & Partners.

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Oxford Street faceted glass facade by architects Future Systems (now Amanda Levete Architects), built 2008. 187-195 Oxford Street, London

Looking up from street level to Oxford Street faceted glass facade by architects Future Systems

Elevation of Oxford Street faceted glass facade

Contrasting old and new architecture in London. Detail of facades on Oxford Street, London. Left: Late 19th century facade now Radcliffe College Language School. Right: 187-195 Oxford Street faceted glass facade by architect’s Future Systems, built 2008

Oxford Street faceted glass facade by architects Future Systems (now Amanda Levete Architects) with Arup, built 2008. In the words of the architect they created “vibrant jewel-like glass frontage…Through the repetition of crystal-like glass bays, a sense of scale and rhythm is created.”

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Steel and glass latticework roof of the Great Court at the British Museum, London. Built 2000, Architect: Foster and Partners Engineer: Buro Happold

The form of the lattice work roof is that of a dome stretched into a circle like a donut. Aside from the project’s beauty the structure is an engineering and fabrication tour de force. The latticework is made of seven and a half miles of top-grade shipbuilding steel (6,000 beams and 1,800 connecting pieces) which is made weathertight with 3,312 uniquely shaped panels of glass. The roof’s computer determined geometry takes up all the irregularities of the old building to the tolerance of three millimetres. Because the steel expands and contracts with heat, cold and wind, it sits on sliding bearings which also serve to spread its weight evenly across Smirke’s facades.

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