Archives for posts with tag: Architecture

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

RAF Upper Heyford , "QRA" Quick Reaction Alert Facility "HAS" Ha

“Whispering Death” was the nick name for the F-111 fighter-bomber that were housed inside these Hardened Aircraft Shelters during the cold war in the RAF Upper Heyford, Quick Reaction Alert Facility, UK. I thought the moniker was also an apt title for this series of photographs of the military paranoia of the era. Crews sat for four hour shifts in nuclear-armed F-111 bombers, engines running in the middle of the Oxfordshire countryside ready to respond to any Soviet threat at a moments notice. The facility is the best preserved Cold War Airfield in Europe.

The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014 The Great Pavilion by De Boer. RHS Chelsea Flower Show,  2014

An assignment for De Boer structures and & Twelve PR to provide architectural photography of the RHS Chelsea Flower Show Great Pavilion 2014. I think I was the only one not primarily pointing their camera at the beautiful plants on display!

The wide angle interiors were taken with a wide angle (17mm) tilt shift lens. and the details with a 70-200mm telephoto lens. All were tripod mounted. A gentle gradient filter was applied to balance the tone of bright roof structure with the darker displays when they both appeared in the same frame.

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Quintin Lake:

Looks like an interesting discussion on Architectural Photography for those in London

Originally posted on The Miniclick Photo Talks:

We’re heading back to the Anise Gallery in London for our second panel discussion with them, in what we hope will become a pretty long series. Back in October 2013 we curated a panel on contemporary British landscape photography to coincide with Marc Wilson’s beautiful exhibition of his Last Stand work.

The gallery has a strong architectural leaning and in February, whilst Paul Raftery’s fantastic “Berlin Voids” exhibition is on, they’ve invited us back to put together a panel on architectural photography. Photographing architecture is an odd thing – creating two dimensional images of someone else’s work of art that is inherently intended to be experienced in three dimensions. Most buildings are seen by more people on the pages of magazines, or on blogs, than they are in person. It also has a history of being photographed empty, devoid of the people who the structure is intended to be used…

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Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

Spun Candy, Covent Garden

An assignment for architects Data Nature Associates to photograph their design for Spun Candy in Covent Garden, London.

My 20 favourite photographs from 2013 –  happy travels for 2014!

1/ Western Desert Journey, Egypt more>>

Sam McConnell prepares for a night under the stars, White Desert

2/ Landscape Magazine Cover Feature more>>

IMG_2315-2 

3/ Copper Staircase, Villa Mallorca by Arup & Studio Mishin more>>

4/ Sahara Sands more>>

Sahara Sands I (Western Desert, Egypt)

5/ Manolo Blahnik, Harrods by Data Nature Associates more>>

Manolo Blahnik, Harrods by Data Nature Associates

6/ Apartment T by Krause Architects and Upton-Hansen Architects more>>

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

7/ AnalogFolk photoshoot cover feature in Conde Magazine more>>

248-封面(小)

8/ Pyramids more>>
Great Pyramid of Giza in front of modern skyline of Cairo

9/ Infinite Forest more>>

IMG_1931

10/ RAF Bicester Unlocked more>>

Operations Block. Building 146

11/ Cancer Centre Naestved by Effekt & Søren Jensen more>>

Cancer Centre (Livsrum) Naestved, Denmark. Architect: Effekt.  E

12/ Invisible Gods more>>

Demeter

13/ Bundeswehr Military History Museum, Dresden more>>

Bundeswehr Military History Museum, Dresden

14/ Ridgeway: Momently Clinging more>>

Ridgeway II, Wiltshire

15/ Saxo Bank HQ by 3XN, Copenhagen more>>

Saxo Bank Headquarters by 3XN

16/ Norfolk Horizon (Homage to Gursky) more>>

17/ Walk On catalogue cover more>>

 

IMG_2325

18/ Canterbury Cathedral more>>

Canterbury Cathedral. The western crossing, with a view of the fan vaulting in the “Angel Steeple.”

19/ Wadi Rum Journey more>>

Wadi Rum, Jordan

20/ From Greenland to the Sahara: Interview  more>>

On_landscape_emag_64

Saint Catherine's Monastery below Mount Sinai

Saint Catherine’s Monastery below Mount Sinai

Mighty granite walls protect the monastery

Mighty granite walls protect the monastery

Much of the walls have stood for 14 centuries

Much of the walls have stood for fourteen centuries

Cross carved in the granite walls

Cross carved in the granite walls

At one point in history all of the doors were sealed up, and entrance was made through a lift, which was also used to haul up supplies.

At one point in history all of the doors were sealed up, and entrance was made through a lift, which was also used to haul up supplies.

Saint Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai, Egypt

The building sits in the wildest imaginable location

Saint Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai, Egypt

Detail of window in the corner buttress

Saint Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai, Egypt

The route to Mount Sinai starts at the left of the monastery

Lift structure and modern entrance.

Lift structure and modern entrance.

Bell tower (left) & Mosque Minaret (right) inside courtyard

Bell tower (left) & Mosque Minaret (right) inside courtyard

Bell tower, Built in 1871

Bell tower, Built in 1871

Cross carved in the granite walls

Cross carved in the granite walls

The monastery contains the Katholikon, various chapels, a amosque , library and cells for the monks.

The monastery contains the Katholikon, various chapels, a amosque , library and cells for the monks.

Bell tower (left) & Mosque Minaret (right)

Bell tower (left) & Mosque Minaret (right)

Saint Catherine's Monastery below Mount Sinai

Saint Catherine’s Monastery below Mount Sinai

The monastery of St. Catherine in Sinai, Egypt, is the oldest active Christian monastery in the world. It is the site where Moses is supposed to have seen the burning bush.

The monastery’s library holds a unique collection of Byzantine manuscripts second only to the vatican in scale. The site is sacred to both Christianity and Islam. A mosque was built within the walls of the monastery, but it has never been used since it is not correctly oriented towards Mecca.

Built between 548 and 565 the massive granite walls have stood for over fourteen centuries. The walls were repaired in 1801 during Napoleon’s Egyptian expedition. The bell tower was built in 1871 and contains nine bells of different sizes that were a gift of the Czars of Russia.

See more photos here >>

Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects Studio, Oxford by James Wyman Architects

An assignment for James Wyman Architects to document their Studio in Oxford. More Images

All images available for publication / licensing contact me for pricing or to commission your own shoot

Canterbury Cathedral. The western crossing, with a view of the fan vaulting in the “Angel Steeple.”

Canterbury Cathedral. The western crossing, with a view of the fan vaulting in the “Angel Steeple.”

Steps worn by the passing centuries of pilgrims feet…and knees

Steps worn by the passing centuries of pilgrims feet…and knees

The Nave, Canterbury Cathedral built in the late gothic Perpendicular style, 1480's

The Nave, Canterbury Cathedral built in the late gothic Perpendicular style, 1480’s

Thomas Becket was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170

Thomas Becket was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170

Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest Christian buildings in England and one of the great pilgrimage sites of Europe in the medieval times.

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