Archives for posts with tag: house
Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Living room with flush fitting door to kitchen at far left

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Many fittings are coordinated in Ferrari red

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Detail of dining table lamp

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Dining table with storage below bench seat

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Bang & Olufsen AV system in living room

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Ferrari red dining chair

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Living room and office

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Detail of fitted furniture

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Bedroom

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Soft furnishing in bedroom

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Detail of custom shower enclosure

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Custom shower enclosure

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

The carefully lit kitchen cabinets

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

the kitchen is a subtle palette of white and grey

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Red hanging files

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Bespoke recessed cupboard handles

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Detail of kitchen cabinets

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Custom floor to ceiling doors have no frame

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Electronic control switch

Barrett Street Residence, London. Krause Architects

Bedroom with en suite

Immaculately detailed minimalist London apartment for a Ferrari collector by Krause Architects and Upton-Hansen Architects. The apartment was handed over to the client fully furnished with every detail chosen to reflect the owners interest in quality materials and sports car aesthetics.

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All images available for publication / licensing contact me for pricing or to commission your own shoot.

An unashamedly modern house designed to maximise the spectacular views the site provides. The building is clad in limestone to fit in with the local vernacular.  Concept Architect: Powell Tuck Associates, Project Management & Interior Design: Pilar Albertson More Photos

At the front door, the house opens up to provide clear views through to the garden and staircase

The kitchen on the first floor,  serves both a functional purpose and defines the surrounding spaces

The discrete wall panelling provides an understated backdrop to the ground floor living activities

Full-height doors allow the spaces of the house to flow into each other

Hidden doors conceal laundry and storage spaces beyond

Contemporary fit out to 1930′s semi detached house in North London by Krause Architects. This photoshoot was about getting the right simplicity of composition and colour tone to compliment the minimal and refined design. Most shots were taken with a 17mm tilt shift lens with fill-in flash when needed. As the interiors had mixed natural and artificial light sources (which appear as different colours in camera) these were balanced by masking in post production.

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All images available for publication / licensing contact me for pricing. 

My photographs of Julia Haensel Architecture‘s glass walled meditation space were recently published in 1000x European Architecture by Braun Architecture. See more images of this building.

Thabang and family outside their home in Ha Motenalapi in the Senqunyane valley, Lesotho, 2000

Thabang and family outside their home in Ha Motenalapi in the Senqunyane valley, Lesotho. We were camped in tents nearby on an archaeological expedition and they invited us to sleep in this hut for three nights even though this meant the whole family slept in a smaller hut out of frame. They are wearing their Basotho tribal blankets. The door and window mouldings demonstrate Litema, the mural art of the Basotho. The hut floor and window mouldings are made from Daga, a mix of earth and dung. The high ammonia content of the dung acts as an antiseptic. The patterns engraved around the doorways may represent the surrounding furrowed fields.

Signed gallery prints available here >>

Larch House at dusk, Horsley, Gloucestershire. Architect: Millar+Howard Workshop

An architectural photography assignment for  Millar + Howard Workshop  of a new build eco-house Nr Nailsworth. The house includes a combination of open plan living with smaller private spaces and strong links with outside spaces and panoramic views. The house is built for  for extremely low energy consumption and fuelled by a wood pellet stove, is super-insulated, and makes use of solar panels and heat recovery ventilation. Sustainable Construction by Greenheart

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All images available for publication / licensing contact me for pricing. 


Cockadilly, Nympsfield, Gloucestershire. Architect Millar+Howard

An architectural photography assignment for  Millar + Howard Workshop of their HQ and private residence at Cockadilly, Nympsfield in Gloucestershire which is a large extension to an existing Cotswold house.  Large sliding windows open out onto the Uley Valley below.

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All images available for publication / licensing contact me for pricing. 


Interior of Postmodernism: Style and Subversion Exhibition at the V&A Museum. Photo: Dezeen

Gehry House, by Frank Gehry, Santa Monica. Photograph featured in V&A Postmodernism Exhibition. Photo: Quintin Lake

My photo of  Frank Gehry’s Santa Monica house is printed alongside other icons of  deconstructionist architecture by Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates. The curators were keen to include Gehry’s residence as it symbolizes an “early venture in bricolage and the postmodern”. The house built in 1978 represented the first and radical steps of Deconstructivist movement in architecture more info and photos on the building.

My personal sentiments on postmodernism which developed as an architecture student are encapsulated by Alastair Sooke who wrote in the Telegraph

Charles Jencks, the architectural theorist credited with inventing the term “postmodernism”, once pointed out that what is exciting and avant-garde one moment tends to feel like old hat the next. No doubt he is right: younger generations often berate the immediate past to assert their own identity. Even so, walking through the V&A’s new exhibition, which traces the rise and fall of postmodernism across different disciplines during the Seventies and Eighties, I was tempted to ask: has there ever been a more irritating movement in the history of art and design?”

Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990
24 September 2011 – 15 January 2012 at V&A South Kensington info

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