Archives for posts with tag: Architectural Photography

Steel and glass latticework roof of the Great Court at the British Museum, London. Built 2000, Architect: Foster and Partners Engineer: Buro Happold

The form of the lattice work roof is that of a dome stretched into a circle like a donut. Aside from the project’s beauty the structure is an engineering and fabrication tour de force. The latticework is made of seven and a half miles of top-grade shipbuilding steel (6,000 beams and 1,800 connecting pieces) which is made weathertight with 3,312 uniquely shaped panels of glass. The roof’s computer determined geometry takes up all the irregularities of the old building to the tolerance of three millimetres. Because the steel expands and contracts with heat, cold and wind, it sits on sliding bearings which also serve to spread its weight evenly across Smirke’s facades.

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London old and new. At left: St Stephen Walbrook Church built 1672-9 by architect Sir Christopher Wren. At right: Walbrook Office Building, built 2010. Architect: Foster and Partners. Engineer: Arup

Evening sun catches the solar cladding of the Walbrook Office Building.

Detail of lustrous reflections on the Fiber-Reinforced Polymer solar cladding of the Walbrook Office Building, London. Built 2010. Architect: Foster and Partners. Engineer: Arup

The Walbrook is an office building designed by Foster and Partners & Arup which is clad with a unique form of solar shading, helping to improving the buildings energy efficiency. This cladding is made entirely from Fiber-Reinforced Polymer – a material which has not been used to this extent on buildings before – which gives it a high sheen, similar to that of a car. FRP is commonly used in the aerospace, automotive and marine industries due to its strength and lightness.

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Coloured terracotta facade detail of Central St Giles. Architects: Renzo Piano Building Workshop with Fletcher Priest. London, 2010.

Central Saint Giles is a mixed-use development in central London. Built at a cost of £450 million and completed in May 2010, it was designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano and is his first work in the UK. Bright green, red, yellow, orange, and two shades of grey terracotta ceramic make up the façade cladding. For more technical info on the cladding see here.

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Larch House at dusk, Horsley, Gloucestershire. Architect: Millar+Howard Workshop

An architectural photography assignment for  Millar + Howard Workshop  of a new build eco-house Nr Nailsworth. The house includes a combination of open plan living with smaller private spaces and strong links with outside spaces and panoramic views. The house is built for  for extremely low energy consumption and fuelled by a wood pellet stove, is super-insulated, and makes use of solar panels and heat recovery ventilation. Sustainable Construction by Greenheart

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Detail of tensile fabric facade, The Wave Car park, Cardiff Bay, Wales. Architects: Scott Brownrigg

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Detail of Copper oxide coated sheet steel cladding, Wales Millennium Centre by Percy Thomas Architects, 2004. Cardiff Bay, Wales. Calligraphy reads Creu Gwir Fel Gwydr O Ffwrnais Awen (Welsh) In These Stones Horizons Sing (English)

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Cedar wood ceiling inside the National Assembly for Wales Senedd (Senate) Building. Architect: Richard Rogers Partnership, 2006. Cardiff Bay, Wales.

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Cockadilly, Nympsfield, Gloucestershire. Architect Millar+Howard

An architectural photography assignment for  Millar + Howard Workshop of their HQ and private residence at Cockadilly, Nympsfield in Gloucestershire which is a large extension to an existing Cotswold house.  Large sliding windows open out onto the Uley Valley below.

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All images available for publication / licensing contact me for pricing. 


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