Archives for posts with tag: Georgian Architecture

Detail of left hand end of the The Royal Crescent, Bath, England, by Architect John Wood the Younger

The Royal Crescent is a residential road of 30 houses, laid out in a crescent, in the city of Bath, England. Designed by the architect John Wood the Younger and built between 1767 and 1774, it is among the greatest examples of Georgian architecture to be found in the United Kingdom and is a grade I listed building.

It was originally called just The Crescent and the adjective Royal was added at the end of the 18th century after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany had lived at numbers 1 and 16. Like The Circus, The Royal Crescent is constructed from Bath Stone, a Limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate. Its warm, honey colouring gives the circus and much of Bath its distinctive appearance.

Pattern of the facade and railings at the The Royal Crescent, Bath, England, by Architect John Wood the Younger

Wood designed the great curved façade of what appears to be about 30 three storey houses with Ionic columns on a rusticated ground floor. The columns are 30 inches (76 cm) in diameter reaching 47 feet (14.3 m) and there are 114 in total, each with an entablature 5 feet (1.5 m) deep. The central house has two sets of coupled columns.

Each purchaser bought a certain length of the façade, and then employed their own architect to build a house to their own specifications behind it; hence what appears to be two houses is sometimes one. This system of town planning is betrayed at the rear of the crescent: while the front is completely uniform and symmetrical, the rear is a mixture of differing roof heights, juxtapositions and fenestration. This “Queen Anne fronts and Mary-Anne backs” architecture occurs repeatedly in Bath

VIEW MORE IMAGES of Royal Crescent, Bath, England, by Architect John Wood the Younger here

Photography © Quintin Lake, 2010

Detail of The Circus, Bath, England, by Architect John Wood the Elder

The Circus is an example of Georgian architecture in the city of Bath, Somerset, England, begun in 1754 and completed in 1768. The name comes from the Latin ‘circus’, which means a ring, oval or circle

The Circus, was designed by the architect John Wood the Elder, although he never lived to see his plans put into effect as he died less than three months after the first stone was laid. It was left to his son, John Wood the Younger to complete the scheme to his father’s design.

The Circus, Bath, England, by Architect John Wood the Elder

Wood’s inspiration was the Roman Colosseum, but whereas the Colosseum was designed to be seen from the outside, the Circus faces inwardly. The circus consists of 3 storey townhouses and mansard. 3 or 4 windows. Divided into 3 blocks, all of the same size but each with a different number of houses. Three classical Orders, (Greek Doric, Roman/Composite and Corinthian) are used, one above the other, in the elegant curved facades. The masonry between columns is not curved but this is not apparent. The frieze of the Doric entablature is decorated with alternating triglyphs and 525 unique pictorial emblems in the metopes, including serpents, nautical symbols, devices representing the arts and sciences, and masonic symbols. The parapet is adorned with stone acorn finials.

Like The Royal Crescent, The Circus is constructed from Bath Stone, a Limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate. Its warm, honey colouring gives the circus and much of Bath its distinctive appearance.

VIEW MORE IMAGES  of The Circus, Bath, England, by Architect John Wood the Elder here

Photography © Quintin Lake, 2010

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