Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

Purton Hulks - Ships' Graveyard

In the early 20th century, a number of old vessels were run aground along the bank of the Severn, near Purton, to create a makeshift tidal erosion barrier to reinforce the narrow strip of land between the river and Sharpness to Gloucester canal. Barges, Trows and Schooners were “hulked” at high tide, and have since filled with silt. More boats have been added, including the schooner “Katherine Ellen” which was impounded in 1921 for running guns to the IRA, the Kennet Canal barge “Harriett”, and Ferrous Concrete Barges built in World War II.

Part fifteen of a photo series based on a walk along the entire 354km length of United Kingdom’s longest river, The Severn.

More from The Severn Project

Images available as limited edition prints and licensing contact me for pricing. 

Purton Hulks