Archives for posts with tag: Iran

The grand iwan of the  Jameh Mosque of Yazd is crowned by a pair of minarets, the highest in Iran, and the portal’s facade is decorated from top to bottom in dazzling tile work.

A woman wearing a chador walks past the blue tile work of the the Jameh Mosque of Yazd, Iran

The grand iwan and Muqarnas of the mosque

The Jameh Mosque of Yazd, courtyard

Geometrical timber work, The Jameh Mosque of Yazd

The Jameh Mosque of Yazd (Persian: €“ Masjid-e-Jāmeh Yazd) is the grand, congregational mosque (Jāmeh) of Yazd, Iran. Built 12-14th Century. The grand iwan of the mosque is  crowned by a pair of minarets, the highest in Iran, and the portal’s facade is decorated from top to bottom in dazzling tile work, predominantly blue in colour.

Achaemenid Tombs at Naqsh-e Rustam

Tomb of Darius II. Achaemenid Tombs at Naqsh-e Rustam, Fars, Iran

Tomb of Darius II. Achaemenid Tombs at Naqsh-e Rustam, Fars, Iran

Bas releif detail of Tomb of Darius II

The Ka’ba-ye Zartosht  meaning the “Cube of Zoroaster,”which  is a 5th century B.C.E. Achaemenid-era tower-like construction at Naqsh-e Rustam, an archaeological site just northwest of Persepolis, Iran. This enigmatic structure is one of many surviving examples of the achaemenid architectural design.

“Cube of Zoroaster,”  at Naqsh-e Rustam,

Achaemenid Tombs at Naqsh-e Rustam, also referred to as the Necropolis  of the Persian crosses. The four tombs belonging to the Achaemenid kings are carved out of the rock face with the entrance to each tomb at the center of each cross, this opens onto to a small chamber, where the king lay in a sarcophagus. The horizontal beam of each of the tomb’s facades is believed to be a replica of the entrance of the palace at Persepolis. One of the tombs is that of Darius I the Great (c. 522-486 BC). The other three tombs are believed to be those of Xerxes I (c. 486-465 BC), Artaxerxes I (c. 465-424 BC), and Darius II (c. 423-404 BC) respectively.

West-side iwan of the Jameh Mosque, Isfahan

North-side iwan, Jameh Mosque, Isfahan

South-side iwan seen from North-side arch, Jameh Mosque, Isfahan

Muqarnas (decorative corbel) Jameh Mosque, Isfahan

Muqarnas (decorative corbel) Jameh Mosque, Isfahan

The Jameh Mosque is the congregational mosque (Jameh) of Isfahan city, Iran (Persian: مسجد جامع اصفهان‎ – Masjid-e-Jāmeh). The mosque is the result of continual construction and reconstruction from around 771 to the end of the 20th century making it one of the oldest mosques still standing in Iran. I felt the Muqarnas (decorative corbels) are amongst the most beautiful in Islamic architecture for their sublime combination of subtle colour, complex geometry and heavily sculptural form.

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Mural text reads “Martyrdom is the art of the men of God”. Imam Khomeini” and “Generals Shiroodi and Keshvari”

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran (notice two windows in the wall)

Mural text reads “The Martyr Pilots of IRI Army Aviation: Major-General Mansour VatanPour, Major-General Seyed Shahrokh Azin”,

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran

Obscured English text reads “Down with USA & Israel. His excellency the leader: Imam Khomeini’s followers are always supporting Palestinians and fight their enemies”

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran

Mural commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, Tehran

Murals commemorating martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) Tehran, Iran, 2008. Please let me know if you can help translating the Farsi in the images above where no translation is shown.

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Exterior of Ice house or Yakhchal, Abarqu, Iran

Brick interior of Yakhchal

An ice house or Yakhchal is an ancient refrigerator allowing the storage of ice in the desert in summer. It was collected in winter and kept cool by its shape and walls made from special mortar called srooj, composed of sand, clay, egg whites, lime, goat hair, and ash, which was resistant to heat transfer. Abarqu, Iran, 2008

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A young woman wearing hijab and jeans takes a photograph with a mobile (cell) phone, Shiraz, Iran

A girl at the window of The Arg (Citadel) of Karim Khan, Shiraz, Iran

Iranian man and his son eat ice cream Shiraz, Iran

Two Iranian women sit talking while wearing a Chador in Shiraz, Iran

Iranian girl wearing headscarf Shiraz, Iran

Portrait of a young Iranian man Shiraz, Iran

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Photography © Quintin Lake, 2010

The Arg (Citadel) of Karim Khan, Shiraz, Iran

Detail of brickword of The Arg (Citadel) of Karim Khan, Shiraz, Iran

The southeastern tower of The Arg of Karim Khan having partially subsided into the underground sewerage system that served the Args bathhouse

Windows of the Internal courtyard of The Arg (Citadel) of Karim Khan, Shiraz, Iran

Built in 1766 the Arg of Karim Khan is located at Shohada Square, Shiraz, Iran. The citadel of Karim Khan consists of four high walls connected by four 14 m round brick towers at a 90-degree angle. Each 12m wall is crenalized and is 3 metres thick at the base and 2.8 metres at the top. The design of the citadel combines military and residential architecture, for it was the home ofKarim Khan and the military centre of the dynasty.

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Photography © Quintin Lake, 2010

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