Archives for posts with tag: California

Interior of Postmodernism: Style and Subversion Exhibition at the V&A Museum. Photo: Dezeen

Gehry House, by Frank Gehry, Santa Monica. Photograph featured in V&A Postmodernism Exhibition. Photo: Quintin Lake

My photo of  Frank Gehry’s Santa Monica house is printed alongside other icons of  deconstructionist architecture by Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates. The curators were keen to include Gehry’s residence as it symbolizes an “early venture in bricolage and the postmodern”. The house built in 1978 represented the first and radical steps of Deconstructivist movement in architecture more info and photos on the building.

My personal sentiments on postmodernism which developed as an architecture student are encapsulated by Alastair Sooke who wrote in the Telegraph

Charles Jencks, the architectural theorist credited with inventing the term “postmodernism”, once pointed out that what is exciting and avant-garde one moment tends to feel like old hat the next. No doubt he is right: younger generations often berate the immediate past to assert their own identity. Even so, walking through the V&A’s new exhibition, which traces the rise and fall of postmodernism across different disciplines during the Seventies and Eighties, I was tempted to ask: has there ever been a more irritating movement in the history of art and design?”

Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990
24 September 2011 – 15 January 2012 at V&A South Kensington info

The Eames House or Case Study House No. 8, by Charles and Ray Eames Los Angeles, California. Photo: Quintin Lake

Located upon a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and hand-constructed in 1949 within a matter of days entirely of pre-fabricated steel parts intended for industrial construction, it remains a milestone of modern architecture. Designed by husband-and-wife design pioneers Charles and Ray Eames, to serve as their home and studio. The Eames’ proposal reflected their own household and their own needs; a young married couple wanting a place to live, work and entertain in one undemanding setting in harmony with the site. Perhaps the proof of its success in fulfilling its program is the fact that it remained at the center of the Eames’ life and work from the time they moved in (Christmas Eve, 1949) until their deaths.

VIEW MORE / BUY PRINTS / LICENSE IMAGES of the Eames House here >>

Gehry House at Santa Monica, California, designed by Frank Gehry. built in 1978 this was his first ‘Deconstructivist’ Building. Photo: Quintin Lake

Frank Gehry’s house built in 1978 in Santa Monica represented the first and radical steps of Deconstructivist movement in architecture. Gehry took his seemingly ordinary house in Santa Monica and began changing things in incredibly strange ways. He took a step beyond the playful reworkings of Postmodern architecture, where traditional design symbols were reinterpreted, and instead starting using materials and strategies few applied to architectural projects at the time. Gehry started by tearing the drywall off of interior walls to expose structural studs buried in the old house, then subtracted and added architectural elements seemingly without a coherent plan throughout the building. He added chain link and plywood to the exterior. His transformations were responses to various impulses and were allowed to coexist without a clear rhyme or reason, flying in the face of both Modernism and Postmodernism – designs from which were typically justified in terms of some kind of central concept. This house was the start of Gehry’s freestyle architectural expression which has culminated in recent times in his most well known buildings the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

VIEW MORE / BUY PRINTS / LICENSE IMAGES of Gehry House here >>

Detail of cast concrete Hollyhock motif on the western facade of Hollyhock House, Los Angeles designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Photo: Quintin Lake

The Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House,sits at the centre of in Barnsdall Art Park in East Hollywood, California, California was designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright 1919–1921. Like the Charles Ennis House, executed later, this house illustrates Wright’s fascination with the stylised forms of  pre-Columbian architecture, in this case Mayan temples. Wright called the style rather disingenuously California Romanza. The stylised patterns of hollyhocks repeated in cast concrete and the window design was due to the Aline Barnsdall’s fondness for the flower. The building was restored after undergoing extensive damage from the 1994 Northridge Earthquake.

VIEW MORE / BUY PRINTS / LICENSE IMAGES of Hollyhock House here >>

%d bloggers like this: