Archives for posts with tag: LA

Interior of Postmodernism: Style and Subversion Exhibition at the V&A Museum. Photo: Dezeen

Gehry House, by Frank Gehry, Santa Monica. Photograph featured in V&A Postmodernism Exhibition. Photo: Quintin Lake

My photo of  Frank Gehry’s Santa Monica house is printed alongside other icons of  deconstructionist architecture by Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates. The curators were keen to include Gehry’s residence as it symbolizes an “early venture in bricolage and the postmodern”. The house built in 1978 represented the first and radical steps of Deconstructivist movement in architecture more info and photos on the building.

My personal sentiments on postmodernism which developed as an architecture student are encapsulated by Alastair Sooke who wrote in the Telegraph

Charles Jencks, the architectural theorist credited with inventing the term “postmodernism”, once pointed out that what is exciting and avant-garde one moment tends to feel like old hat the next. No doubt he is right: younger generations often berate the immediate past to assert their own identity. Even so, walking through the V&A’s new exhibition, which traces the rise and fall of postmodernism across different disciplines during the Seventies and Eighties, I was tempted to ask: has there ever been a more irritating movement in the history of art and design?”

Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990
24 September 2011 – 15 January 2012 at V&A South Kensington info

Detail of travertine floor at the Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Museum entrance hall seen from the entrance plaza. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Visitor shadows on the restaurant at the Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Family room facade detail of polished and rough cut travertine. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Curving Brise soleil by the cafe. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Exhibitions Pavilion with a view to Los Angeles. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Family room reflected in the west pavilion. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Sunset on the Detail of travertine cladding. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

The Family Room and reflection. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Looking up the Family Room facade. Getty Center. Photo: Quintin Lake

Richard Meier’s Getty center in LA is symphony of pale forms and surface texture which are brought to life by the the beautiful LA light and the immaculate condition in which the building in maintained.

In Andreas Papadakis and James Steele, Architecture of Today (Paris: Terrail, 1991) Meier is quoted as saying:

Architecture is the subject of my architecture…What I seek to do is pursue the plastic limits of modern architecture to include a notion of beauty moulded by light. My wish is to create a kind of spatial lyricism within the canon of pure form. In the design of my buildings, I am expanding and elaborating on what I consider to be the formal base of the Modern Movement…The great promise and richness of some of the formal tenets of Modernism have almost unlimited areas for investigation…I work with volume and surface, I manipulate forms in light, changes in scale and view, movement and stasis.

VIEW MORE / BUY PRINTS / LICENSE IMAGES of the Getty Center here >>

Facade I. Detail of the stainless steel facade of the Walt Disney Concert Hall, LA. Photo: Quintin Lake

Facade II. Detail of the stainless steel facade of the Walt Disney Concert Hall, LA. Photo: Quintin Lake

Facade III. Detail of the stainless steel facade of the Walt Disney Concert Hall, LA. Photo: Quintin Lake

The subtle abstract quality of the matte stainless steel panels as they catch the light is what struck me the most about Frank Gehry’s celebrated and much photographed Deconstructivist Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles built in 2003. Originally, one portion of the building featured highly polished panels; however, these were dulled in 2005 due to heat reflection problems in nearby buildings. See images of the Gehry House, LA from 1978 where his experiments with deconstructivism in architecture began.

See more photos of details, facade elevations and complete views of the building here >>

Gehry House at Santa Monica, California, designed by Frank Gehry. built in 1978 this was his first ‘Deconstructivist’ Building. Photo: Quintin Lake

Frank Gehry’s house built in 1978 in Santa Monica represented the first and radical steps of Deconstructivist movement in architecture. Gehry took his seemingly ordinary house in Santa Monica and began changing things in incredibly strange ways. He took a step beyond the playful reworkings of Postmodern architecture, where traditional design symbols were reinterpreted, and instead starting using materials and strategies few applied to architectural projects at the time. Gehry started by tearing the drywall off of interior walls to expose structural studs buried in the old house, then subtracted and added architectural elements seemingly without a coherent plan throughout the building. He added chain link and plywood to the exterior. His transformations were responses to various impulses and were allowed to coexist without a clear rhyme or reason, flying in the face of both Modernism and Postmodernism – designs from which were typically justified in terms of some kind of central concept. This house was the start of Gehry’s freestyle architectural expression which has culminated in recent times in his most well known buildings the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

VIEW MORE / BUY PRINTS / LICENSE IMAGES of Gehry House here >>

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